Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease caused by a faulty gene. This gene controls the movement of salt and water in and out of your cells, so the lungs and digestive system become clogged with mucus, making it hard to breathe and digest food.

 

More than 2.5 million people in the UK carry the faulty gene, around one in 25 of the population.

There is currently no cure for cystic fibrosis but many treatments are available to manage it, including physiotherapy, exercise, medication and nutrition.

Each week five babies are born with cystic fibrosis, and two people die.

More than half of the cystic fibrosis population in the UK will live past 41, and improved care and treatments mean that a baby born today is expected to live even longer.

 

 

How does cystic fibrosis affect daily life?

 

Cystic fibrosis affects everyone differently, but for many it involves a rigorous daily treatment regime including physiotherapy, oral, nebulised and occasionally intravenous antibiotics, and taking enzyme tablets with food. Some people with cystic fibrosis will have a feeding tube overnight.

For those who are very ill with cystic fibrosis and with very poor lung function, daily life can be a struggle as basic tasks can leave them breathless. Some patients use a wheelchair to get around, and use oxygen to help them breathe.

 

 

 

For more information please visit:
 
http://www.cysticfibrosis.org.uk/
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